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Inside Ag

Recognize early symptoms first step in dealing with stress

Poor growing and harvesting conditions, low commodity prices, trade wars and a shortage of livestock feed for winter all have been stressful for North Dakota farmers and ranchers. North Dakota State University Extension has developed a number of resources to help farmers and ranchers cope ...

Field peas possible alternative to distillers grains

CARRINGTON – Field peas may be an alternative to distillers grains as a protein source in cattle feed if the field peas are at a low enough cost, according to a North Dakota State University Extension livestock systems specialist in NDSU Agriculture Communication information. Distillers ...

Sheep producers need to keep marketing options open

Sheep producers need to keep their marketing options open during the COVID-19 outbreak, said Travis Hoffman, North Dakota State University Extension sheep specialist, in NDSU Agriculture Communication information. “We are undoubtedly in a different time than expected for livestock producers ...

‘You just can’t shut down agriculture’

For agriculture producers who are already in a tough position with some fall crops still in the field and low market prices, a coronavirus outbreak has exacerbated their position. Farmers are starting the 2020 crop year in a bind, said North Dakota Agriculture Commissioner Doug ...

Livestock producers should prepare for some challenges

With fallen market prices, Tim Petry, North Dakota State University Extension livestock marketing economist, said livestock producers should prepare for the worst and hope for the best. “One thing about calves being born now and looking ahead to fall, we have time to apply there what’s ...

Looking ahead

Concerns over COVID-19 has resulted in uncertainty about its long-term impacts on the grain and livestock markets and energy prices. Frayne Olson, North Dakota State University Extension crops economist and marketing specialist, was among experts from NDSU Extension to address these ...

Proper spring grain drying and storage critical

As outdoor temperatures increase, stored grain requires attention to prevent losses, said Ken Hellevang, North Dakota State University Extension agricultural engineer and grain drying expert, in information provided by NDSU Agriculture Communication. The stored grain temperature increases in ...

Get to know your grass

North Dakota producers depend on forage as their primary source of nutrients for livestock, whether it is rangeland, pasture or hay, according to NDSU Agriculture Communication information. While producers carefully select species to be used as cover crops or part of a total mixed ration, ...

Planting season ahead

The upcoming planting season is very much on the minds of area farmers, but it remains several days or weeks away. Both soil moisture condition and temperatures will determine how soon planting will actually get underway. Some areas are quite wet and several days of drying out is needed ...

New podcast focuses on growing pulse crops

Anyone interested in growing pulse crops (chickpeas, peas and lentils) will have an opportunity to learn more through a podcast series that North Dakota State University plant pathologist Audrey Kalil initiated in collaboration with Future of Ag, Soil Sense podcaster Tim Hammerich. The first ...

Income, expenses discussed in grain growers workshop

The best year for farm income in the United States was in 1973. The worst income year for farmers was 1983. The last five years have been somewhat below the long-term average. Those were some of the facts provided by Bryon Parman, NDSU Extension Service, Fargo, at the Best of the Best in Wheat ...

Prevent plant insurance on minds of farmers

Minot-area farmers are considering the possibility that last fall’s wet weather could mean some fields will go unplanted this spring. It is on the minds of many as they prepare to finalize their crop insurance by the March 15 deadline. Insurance for prevented planting is standard with a ...

Wet weather increases risk for wheat midge in 2020

Soil samples in North Dakota indicate increasing levels of overwintering wheat midge larvae (cocoons) for the 2020 season, says Janet Knodel, North Dakota State University Extension entomologist in information provided by NDSU Agriculture Communication. A total of 1,900 soil samples were ...

Gunter Honey Inc. co-owner elected president of American Bee Federation

Joan Gunter, one of the co-owners of Gunter Honey Inc. in Towner, has been elected president of the American Bee Federation for 2020. “I am honored to serve as ABF President,” said Gunter in a press release from the organization. “I look forward to continuing the work of the ABF Board ...

Local seed house expands operations

A second Chesak Seed location opened up near the Highway 2 and Highway 52 crossing just after Jan. 1. Chesak Seed opened in Bismarck in 1941 to supply seeds to farmers. Twenty-five percent of the company’s business was from the Minot area, so the owner Jeff Neuberger decided to open an ...

Making soybean decisions

Plant early. That was the advice from Hans Kandel, NDSU Extension Service, Fargo, during his recent presentation to interested soybean producers in Minot. Handel was taking part in a workshop sponsored by the North Dakota Grain Growers Association and the ND Wheat Commission that was held at ...

Difficult harvest creates grain storage hazards

Because of difficult harvest conditions last fall, grain may have been stored with higher than normal moisture content, which could pose a danger to anyone working around the grain, according to information from NDSU Agriculture Communication. “High-moisture grain storage leads to bin ...

NDSU Extension Projects Commodity Prices for 2020

Planning for the future can be a frustrating process especially in times of market volatility, according to NDSU Agriculture Communication. Planning typically pays high dividends. For most farm and ranch managers, developing realistic commodity price expectations is one of the most difficult ...