The tumble into fall

Temperature change denotes autumn arrival in region

Cooler weather and colorful leaves can be expected this time of year in North Dakota. Minot’s has been experiencing a change from warm summer weather to autumn temperatures.

Kim Fundingsland/MDN

Cooler weather and colorful leaves can be expected this time of year in North Dakota. Minot’s has been experiencing a change from warm summer weather to autumn temperatures. Kim Fundingsland/MDN

The changing of the seasons has become evident across North Dakota. Daytime high temperatures have dropped from what they were just a few short days ago. This week looks to be more of a continual progression toward that unmistakable feeling that fall is in the air.

Oddly though, but perhaps not unexpected to weather watching Dakotans, there’s some weird quirks in the immediate forecast. The National Weather Service says there’s a fairly good chance of tornadoes developing today in the eastern part of the state.

“It looks like some severe storms Tuesday afternoon and evening in the Jamestown and Fargo areas, maybe even Grand Forks,” warned Adam Jones, NWS meteorologist in Bismarck. “Maybe a tornado or two. That’s certainly strange for this time of year. Normally our severe weather season is June and July. This is out of the ordinary.”

While the threat of tornadoes was not in Minot’s weather outlook late Monday, wind certainly was. Gusts are expected to exceed 20 miles per hour today and kick up close to 30 miles per hour into Wednesday.

“After that, the rest of the week is pretty quiet,” assured Jones. “It will cool down toward the end of the week with weekend temperatures in the 50s.”

The weather this week appears on track to mirror long-term averages with daytime highs in the 60s and nighttime lows in the 40s. However, cautions Jones, North Dakota’s weather has a history of changing rather quickly.

“That’s the thing about North Dakota. Things change and change again,” said Jones. “This time of year we can expect high temps in the 60s as we make a shift toward an inevitable winter. Still, it’s not unheard of to have a few summer-like days sprinkled in now and then.”

As state residents know, a lengthy fall season makes for an enjoyable time of year with each pleasant day meaning one less day of winter.

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